12 Comments
author

I turned the comments on late, by accident. There are a bunch to read here: https://pau1.substack.com/p/substack-novels

Expand full comment
Jun 3Liked by πŸ…ŸπŸ…πŸ…€πŸ…› πŸ…œπŸ…πŸ…’πŸ…šπŸ…ž

I loved this! Curating those images adds that much more to the masterful prose. Having never read the book (despite its presence in out family library), I would find your Illustrated Frankenstein to be a delightful addition to my casual reading. (Consider this my response to the question you asked in the post about serialization novels.)

Expand full comment
Jun 2Liked by πŸ…ŸπŸ…πŸ…€πŸ…› πŸ…œπŸ…πŸ…’πŸ…šπŸ…ž

Oh, I enjoy it Paul. Call it sentimental value. Victor Frankenstein was one of many literary figures who suffered the consequences of hubris (e.g. Oedipus Rex, Odysseus, Beowulf, Julius Caesar ... all the way up to Jay Gatsby).

Expand full comment
Jun 2Liked by πŸ…ŸπŸ…πŸ…€πŸ…› πŸ…œπŸ…πŸ…’πŸ…šπŸ…ž

How clever was Mary Shelley to tell Victor's story using epistolary framing through Capt. Walton? It is a brilliant literary device, as Walton can both relate to Victor while lamenting his fate.

By the way, the subtitle of the novel is "The Modern Prometheus" ... after the Greek Titan who stole fire from the Gods for mankind, then was punished by Zeus for his transgression. Prometheus was bound to a rock, and an eagleβ€”the emblem of Zeusβ€”was sent to eat his liver. His liver would then grow back overnight, only to be eaten again the next day in an ongoing cycle ... thus was symbolic of Victor's eternal punishment.

Another note: Walton's ship was called Prometheus. Thanks, Paul, for this rememberence.

Expand full comment